73 Questions For Self-Awareness — Topic Sentences For Journaling

73 Questions For Self-Awareness

Topic Sentences For Journaling

What do I need? What do I want? What do I prefer? What’s the difference?

On what does my self-esteem depend?

What makes me feel happy? What makes me feel sad? What makes me feel good about myself?

What makes me feel bad about myself? What makes me feel strong? What makes me feel weak?

What makes me feel powerful? And, how much control over these things, do I have?

What makes me angry? What makes me lose my cool? What annoys me? What troubles me?

What delights me? What fascinates me? What uplifts me? Where do I experience awe?

How is my life meaningful? How is my life significant? How would I want to change the world?

How can I be of service? How can I help? Do I ask for assistance when I could surely use it?

What is my job? What is my duty? What are my obligations? What’s required of me?

Where am I great? Where do I do the most good? Where is some work-on-self necessary?

Whom do I love? How do I love? How do I express love? How do I accept love?

Who loves me? How is love expressed to me? Do I notice and recognize love?

Do I have permission to be loved? What does love mean?

Do I communicate clearly and accurately? Are my communications appropriate?

Do I say, what I want to say? Do I say, what I need to say? Am I a conscious communicator?

Are there any phrases or expressions that I’d like to eliminate from my repertoire?

Am I a good listener? Am I patient with others? Do I ask good questions at the right times?

How do I sound? What messages do my facial expression transmit?

What do I believe? What do I need to believe? What do I want to believe?

What do I prefer to believe? What are my habits of belief? Where did my beliefs originate?

What can I control that I want to control?

Can I forgive others? Can I forgive myself?

What do I remember, what do I forget?

What can I learn from?

What can I change?

What stays the same?

What can I modify?

What can I improve?

And, why?

What are the most desired outcomes?

What is the probability of those outcomes?

How can I increase the probability of those outcomes?

What is my life really about?

Dr. Viktor Frankl … and Me

Dr. Viktor Frankl … and Me

I never met Dr. Frankl, but I am deeply inspired by his philosophy and his classic work, “Man’s Search For Meaning” (1959). When I need inspiration and a better perspective on my own life’s challenges, remembering, and sometimes rereading that book usually does the trick for me. It has been known to snap me out of quite a few self-pity-parties!

Viktor Frankl (1905 – 1997) was born in Vienna. He was a brilliant neurologist and psychologist who was an inmate in several Nazi concentration camps, including Auschwitz and Dachau, during World War II. His wife, mother and brother, also imprisoned for being Jewish, did not survive. His father had died earlier when they were all deported to the Theresienstadt Ghetto in 1942.

After three years in the camps, he was able to return to Austria, where he wrote the book that became “Man’s Search For Meaning” – the original title translated as “Saying Yes to Life in Spite of Everything: A Psychologist Experiences the Concentration Camp.”

He taught the importance of finding meaning in life, even when experiencing extreme suffering and adversity, which of course, he most certainly did.

I often quote Dr. Frankl in my workshops and lectures. My favorites are these two from “Man’s Search For Meaning”:

“Everything can be taken from a man but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.”

“Between stimulus and response, there is a space. In that space is our power to choose our response. In our response lies our growth and our freedom.”

When I face my own challenges, imagining a conversation with Dr. Frankl helps me gain a more rational, realistic and empowering perspective.

For example: I was having some work done on my car. While I was in the waiting area, a friend I hadn’t seen in a couple of years walked in.

“How are you Jerry,” she asked.

I was poised to answer that question by complaining about the expense of an unexpected car repair. But before I spoke, Dr. Frankl popped into my awareness and I thought, “what if Viktor Frankl appeared before me and asked the same question?” Would I be kvetching about a $250 bill, or telling him how grateful I am for the privileges and blessings I’m so fortunate to have? If I choose the latter, I’d probably feel a lot better! So, why would I choose the former? I wouldn’t. It’s just a habit. My “habit” would have “chosen” for me.

Conjuring up the mental image of a respected hero, especially someone who navigated horrific circumstances, might make it a little easier to wait in a long line at the ice cream shop … or cope with an unexpected bill … or respond to an event that is more inconvenience than tragedy.

Cognitive psychology calls this type of exaggeration “magnification.” I’ve also heard it called “awfulizing” and “catastrophising.”

So …”Don’t make mountains out of molehills!”
And maybe, your heroes can help with that!

15 For 2015 — Daily Reminders for a Stellar Year

15 For 2015
Daily Reminders for a Stellar Year
By Jerry Posner

1.   Sometimes a single act of kindness changes everything.
2.   Appreciate and treasure each moment … especially this one.
3.   Need courage? Recall inspirational people and their deeds.
4.   Preparation reduces fear and shrinks worry.
5.   Angry? Count to twenty, slowly. Still angry? Do it again.
6.   Expect miracles.
(If that doesn’t work, notice the ones that already exist.)
7.   Gratitude: feel it, express it, promote it. Be a grati-tutor!
8.   More facts = better beliefs.
9.   Message from your Future-Self: love more, kvetch less.
10. If it’s too difficult to forgive and forget, just choose one.
11.  Put on your (rational) thinking cap … and leave it on.
12. Courtesy is fundamental, indifference is the enemy.
13. Choose your attitude; many fine options available now.
14. Positive expectations just might skew the odds in your favor.
15. What we do, and how we do it, always matters.

“Since there’s always a choice … choose wisely!”

2011 – Your Best Year Ever? A suggestion.

To increase the likelihood of 2011 being your best year ever, here’s a suggestion:  Make two lists:  1.  “What I really, really want in my life.”  2.  “What I really, really don’t want in my life.”  (Materially, financially, spiritually, emotionally, work related, relationship and family related, etc.)  Read daily.  Edit as necessary, and remember to ask yourself, “why?”  Then, do the necessary work – inner and outer.

Some Thoughts On Disappointment

SOME THOUGHTS ON DISAPPOINTMENT  (Or Lack Thereof)

by Jerry Posner, The Posner Group

 

Does this sound familiar?

You have unlimited potential.

Imagine it … and you can have it.

You can have anything you want.

You create your own reality.

Allow the Universe to give you the abundance you deserve.

 

I say:

Maybe.

Under certain circumstances.

Perhaps.

Could be.

 

More practical:

You can increase the likelihood of success.

You can imagine things, think things and do things that are helpful.

You can have a lot of what you want.

You can make really good choices.

You can notice and appreciate the abundance you already have.

 

Can disappointment be fuel for improvement?

            Maybe.

            Under certain circumstances.

            Perhaps.

            Could be.

 

Perhaps you’ve said,

I’m disappointed because …

“I lost a job.”

“I lost some money.”

“I was lied to.”

“I’m not where I think I could be.”

“I didn’t get the love I deserved.”

“I was fooled.  Again.”

“I was rejected.”

“I was betrayed by a trusted friend.”

“My stocks crashed.”

“The restaurant got my order wrong.”

“It’s raining.”

“My butt looks too big in these pants.”

“My children don’t call me enough.”

“I don’t like the way I look.”

“I have to pay more taxes then I thought.”

“The salesperson was rude to me.”

“The jerk in front of me has 14 items in the 12 items or less line.”

 

Depending on my perspective, my state of mind, earlier events that day; I might feel …

Slighted.

Hurt.

Angry.

Pissed off to the max.

Annoyed.

Grateful to be alive.

Slightly uncomfortable.

Joyous.

Smart.

Compassionate.

Patient.

Weathered and beaten.

OK.

Motivated and inspired.

 

What can I do?

Nothing.

Something.

 

What Can I Learn …

about myself?

about my risk tolerance?

about my choices?

about my priorities?

about my sensitive areas?

about my patience, or lack thereof?

about my confidence, or lack thereof?

about my life, or lack thereof?